Relationship between healthy food and age-related cognitive decline

The research from Colorado State University revealed that the following tips can slow your cognitive decline and aging, actually.

  1. Eat you vegetables, especially green leafy veggies.
  2. Eat blueberries and walnuts.
  3. East fish once a week.

How simple these tips are! According to the research, these ingredients supports brain health including memory and processing as you get older. In addition to the eating habit, the increase of fruits and veggies intake, exercise, etc. can also educe age-related risks.

Age-related risks including Alzheimer's disease, dementia, cognitive impairment, etc. are fearful as we age. There is an effective diet developed by Martha Clare Morris from Rush University. Her method is called MIND diet. The MIND diet stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay. The MIND diet proposes to stick with eating Mediterranean food and watching your high blood pressure. 

The MIND diet suggests 10 brain healthy ingredients: green leafy veggies, other veggies, nuts, berries, beans, whole grains, fish, poultry, olive oil, and red wine. On the other hand, there are 5 brain unhealthy ingredients which you should control the intake or avoid: red meat, butter and stick margarine, cheese, sweet pastries, and fried or fast food.

After reading the article, I tried to recall what I usually eat. I believe yakuzen and follow what it suggest me to eat. So, I guess I am almost all right with what the MIND diet proposes. As I noticed, you may also notice there are a lot of common rules between healthy food particularly the MIND diet here and yakuzen theory. Healthy food can fight against getting old with a lots of healthy issues which everyone fears about. Eating healthy can slow your age-related cognitive decline! This is such a great idea for me or you who like to be healthy eaters because eating what you love connects to making you healthy and live longer. 

Source:  http://source.colostate.edu/healthy-food-interventions-may-slow-cognitive-decline